Hand Signal Guide for a Crane Operator to Work Safely

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Guide for a Crane Operator

Hand Signal Guide for a Crane Operator to Work Safely – Handling heavy loads on a construction site seems almost impossible without a crane. Yet, proper use of crane hand signal remarks safe operation and smoother project running. Since construction sites are exceptionally busy and loud, conveying verbal messages has a risk of being drowned in this roaring machinery. Using a hand signal helps to be in accord with your team on the ground and communicate directions to the operator.

Even the most modern crane rental companies use this age-old technique to deliver explicit directions without any fancy equipment or even words!

Hand Signal Guide for a Crane Operator

Please read the list of hand signals to prevent accidents and injuries to the best ability. Ensure the crane hand signal person is standing in clear view of the crane operator to avoid confusion. Check crane services company certifies with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard method of signaling, ensuring safety construction workers on the site.

Stop signals

Stop signals are the most important signals for a crane operation that quickly communicate the need to cease activity or movement of the equipment in use.

  • Stop – Extend a single arm or face the palm down, then swing the extended arm back and forth. First, touch the chest, then back out to the side to pause or stop an action.
  • Emergency stop – Extend both arms with palms down, then swing arms back and forth. First, touch the chest, and then back out to the sides to communicate an emergency stop of the action.
  • Dog everything – Clasping both hands together and holding them at waist level will signal to stop all activity.

Boom signals

The boom signal communicates with the crane operator about the maneuver selection with the boom.

  • Raise boom – Extend arm horizontally to the body sides and signal thumbs up with a closed fist to raise the boom.
  • Lower boom – Extend arm horizontally to the body sides and signal thumbs down with a closed fist to lower the boom.
  • Swing boom – Extend an arm out horizontally, and then use an index finger to point in the required direction to swing the boom accordingly.
  • Extend boom – Place hands in front of the navel and point thumbs outwards with remaining fingers in a fist to increase boom length.

Load signals

Load signals instruct the crane operator what to do with the load using the crane’s hoist once the crane has attached the load to its long chain with a hook.

  • Hoist load – Extend an arm vertically towards the ceiling/sky, pointing with an index finger, and make small clockwise circles with the hand to signal upward lifting of the load.
  • Lower load – Extend an arm vertically, pointing with an index finger towards the ground, and make small clockwise circles with the hand to signal the downward lowering of the load.

Speed signals

Using speed signals, the signal person controls the pace of any movement or activity.

  • Move slowly – Place the hand above the hand, giving the action signal to slow down the action rate.

Crane Signals Promote Jobsite Safety

Be it large all-terrain cranes, huge rough terrain crane, small carry deck cranes, or complex rough terrain cranes, knowledge of crane hand signals ensures the safe operation of all cranes carrying loads weighing hundreds and thousands of pounds. These standardized hand signals promote safety across the entire construction industry and job sites.

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