15 Biggest Nutrition Myths People Have

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15 Biggest Nutrition Myths People Have

Nutrition is about eating healthy food and a balanced diet. Your meals provide the energy and nutrients you need to be healthy. Understanding these nutrition terms may make it easier for you to make better food choices. With so much information at our hands now, you’d think dietary misconceptions would be less prevalent than they were in our grandparents’ day.

Unfortunately, the internet is riddled with disinformation, and it may be impossible to identify what is evidence-based without doing your research. Myths formerly handed down by word-of-mouth spread like wildfire through social media, blogs, and even traditional media. The 15 most common myths are listed above. 

  1. The best post-workout drink is a protein shake.

No, not always. Try green tea instead! Brazilian scientists discovered that volunteers who had three cups of the beverage every day for a week had fewer indicators of the cell damage caused by resistance to exercise. That implies green tea might help you recuperate quicker after a strenuous exercise.

  1. High fructose corn syrup is more destructive than table sugar.

Sugar is very expert at disguising herself. It has more alter egos than the Avengers: maltodextrin, brown rice syrup, dextrose, and sucrose. High Fructose Corn Syrup, then again, is its most notable mask. Whether HFCS is worse than regular table sugar has long been debated.

  1. Ocean Salt is a better option in contrast to ordinary salt.

Everyday table salt is mined and contains around 2,300 milligrams of sodium per teaspoon. Sea salt is made from evaporated saltwater and includes approximately 2,300 milligrams of sodium. As a result, they are almost similar. In addition, proponents refer to that sea salt comprises additional components such as magnesium and iron. However, these minerals are only present in tiny levels.

  1. Energy drinks are safer than soda.

Caffeinated drinks like Red Bull, Monster, and Full Throttle attempt to further develop your energy by including an assortment of B nutrients, plant concentrates, and amino acids. What your body will remember most (particularly around your waistline) is the sugar in these concoctions; a 16-ounce can have up to 280 calories of pure sugar, which is about 80 calories more than a 16-ounce cup of Pepsi.

  1. Diet sodas aid with weight loss.

Nutrition Myths

The obesity-research community is becoming more aware that the artificial sweeteners used in diet soda, such as aspartame and sucralose, cause difficult-to-control food cravings later in the day. Switching to carbonated water and flavoring it with lemon, cucumber, and fresh herbs will help you wean yourself off.

  1. Going Paleo is Better for You

Paleo has become one of the most-searched-for diets in recent years. But, according to Spanish experts, although protein-rich diets might help you lose weight quickly, following a low-carb, high-protein diet can induce weight gain in the long run.

  1. Calories are all created equally.

A 300-calorie serving of healthy food is not the same as a 300-calorie serving of cake. Depending on the ingredients in each meal, the body utilizes and stores calories differently. Corn and beans, for example, contain resistant starch, a form of carb that is very difficult to digest.

  1. Foods labeled “natural” are more nutritious.

The FDA makes no significant attempt to regulate “natural” nutrition labels. Consider the following example: 7UP claims to be created with “100% Natural Flavors,” however the beverage is sweetened with a distinctly unnatural quantity of high fructose corn syrup. “Corn” is a natural product, but “high fructose corn syrup” is created using a centrifuge and a series of chemical processes.

  1. Yogurt is beneficial to your stomach bacteria.

Yes, certain yogurts include helpful bacteria that may reinforce your stomach when needed. Lactobacillus acidophilus is the bacterium to search for in yogurts labeled “live active cultures.” However, most yogurts are so rich in sugar that they contribute more than anything else to foster lousy gut microbes.

In any case, studies have shown that dietary cholesterol has little to do with serum cholesterol, which is the substance in your blood.

  1. Peanut butter is a nutritious food.

Many studies have shown that polyphenols (nutrients present in darkly colored plant foods like cocoa) may do anything from reducing blood pressure to increasing our capacity to burn fat. For example, according to a 2013 research published in the journal Diabetes Medicine, consuming dark chocolate reduced the symptoms of elevated blood sugar in diabetic individuals. Unfortunately, the more processed chocolate, the more polyphenols that are lost.

  1. Oatmeal is beneficial

Okay, oatmeal is beneficial to your health. Suppose it’s simply oats that you prepared from scratch and then sweetened with fruit. However, most oatmeal offered nowadays is more akin to a packet of Kool-Ade mix. For example, consider the instant quaker oatmeal strawberries & cream, which has “flavored and colorful fruit chunks.”

What precisely does it mean?

They’ve injected dried apples or figs with corn syrup solids, cornstarch, and trans fats then combined it with something called a “creaming agent.”

  1. The best source of potassium is bananas.

Your body requires potassium to keep your neurons and muscles working correctly, and an appropriate intake may reduce the influence of salt on blood pressure. According to one 2009 research, a 2:1 potassium-to-sodium ratio might cut your risk of heart disease in half.

  1. Oranges have the highest vitamin c content.

It enhances mood by boosting the flow of norepinephrine, and it increases metabolic efficiency by assisting in the translocation of fat cells into the body’s energy-burning mitochondria. However, since your body cannot store or produce the miracle vitamin, you must maintain a steady supply. The most well-known vitamin-C food is the orange, and although it is an excellent source, it is far from the finest.

  1. Wraps are more nutritious than regular sandwiches.

Those thin little wrappers are light, delicate, and perfect for fusion food. How can they be any worse than the ordinary loaf of bread? Consider the Subway wrap, for example. Before you even add the first scent of the wrap, it delivers 310 calories. The tortilla to fold over that way requires extra fat, regularly as soybean oil and hydrogenated oils.

  1. Bread is unhealthy.

Bread will not make you fat, but it is high in calories and hence easy to overeat. Of course, most people consume bread with additional high-calorie items like butter, peanut butter, jam, or honey. It might result in a calorie excess and, as a result, weight growth over time. Furthermore, although bread may be a healthy element of a balanced diet, a bread-centric diet can drown out other nutrient-dense foods, mainly fruits, and vegetables.

Conclusion

With so much information at our hands now, you’d think dietary misconceptions would be less prevalent than they were in our grandparents’ day.

Unfortunately, the internet is riddled with disinformation, and it may be impossible to identify what is evidence-based without doing your research. Myths formerly handed down by word-of-mouth spread like wildfire through social media, blogs, and even traditional media. The 15 most common myths are listed above.

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